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Greenbank re-opens

By Gord Mahaffy

 

 

Len McKay (AME) helps owners with
their annual inspections.

 

Peter James readies his homebuilt Christavia-Stinson.

 

On Saturday April 18, the crosses were removed from runways 16/34 and Greenbank airport was once again open for business.

After the tragic lost of owner Micky Jovkovic in August 2008 the future of Greenbank airport was very much undecided. Initially a volunteer committee was formed to cut grass and help with general maintenance in order to keep the airport operational for the remainder of 2008. An early winter made it difficult to keep the runways clear of snow and so the airport was closed in late November.

The current owner, Dorothy Javkovic has put the airport up for sale. However, selling an airport is not the same as selling a house and it is anticipated that this might take a little time. A decision was made to operate the airport for the spring and summer of 2009. To facilitate this, Larry Bonehill was hired as airport manager.

LOCATION

Greenbank airport is located just a few km’s North West of Port Perry on Lake Scugog in Southern Ontario. It is just north of the Oshawa airport control zone and about 80 km’s north east of Toronto.

Greenbank itself is uncontrolled, but watch it; it has its own Unicom frequency (122.725). Also, it falls inside the new air space regulations for the Greater Toronto Area.

FACILITIES

Both runways, 16/34 and 03/21 are grass. Runway 16/34 is over 2,500 feet and 03/21 measures 1,800 feet. Fuel is available 24/7 from an automated fuel island; all you need is a credit card. Runway lighting is activated by 5 clicks on your radio (122.725). There are three hangers on site and one hanger is used as a maintenance area and has office and classroom space.

AME SERVICES

Len McKay is a licensed AME who works part-time out of Greenbank. Len has developed a unique service for owners of certified aircraft that have some spare time and would like to save money on their annual inspections and required maintenance.

The program is called “SOME.” It stands for “SUPERVISED OWNER MAINTENANCE & EDUCATION.”

During an annual inspection, the owner will work alongside Len doing much of the routine work, such as removing inspection panels, cowlings, spark plugs, seats and other time consuming chores. This frees Len to do the actual inspections and replacement of required parts. As Len puts it, the word SOME can also mean,” You do SOME and I do SOME.”

The program benefits the owner in two ways. One; it is a whole lot cheaper than turning your aircraft over to a shop, especially in the Greater Toronto Area. And two; by the time the work is finished, the owner will know a whole lot more about his/her aircraft.

Len McKay can be reached at 647-281-8195 or E-mail: centrelineaviation@rogers.com

HOMEBUILDING

Several homebuilt projects are underway at Greenbank. Paul Flieler put his beautifully restored PA-12 back into service at the end of last year but chose not to fly it during the winter.

Sitting beside Paul’s PA-12 is Peter James latest effort, a Christavia-Stinson homebuilt. Peter has been a proliferate homebuilder since the early sixties and worked closely with former COPA director Herb Cunningham in the early homebuilt movement.

He was one of the first builders to put an amateur built aircraft into the air in the Greater Toronto Area. That was a 65Hp Areonca Champ (CF-PSP).

To keep the history of homebuilding alive, Peter has the same colour scheme on his Christavia-Stinson as was on the homebuilt Champ (dark blue on light blue). Peter expects this project will be flying later this summer.

So, if you would like to remind yourself of what grassroots flying is all about, drop into Greenbank airport.